Posts tagged with: abuse

The Church of England wants to hear from victims and survivors as it carries out a full review of past safeguarding cases

Victims and survivors of church related abuse are invited to take part in a major review that has been commissioned nationally by the Church of England across the country. The Diocese of Guildford wants to hear from you, to listen and learn from your experiences.

Coming forward

Anybody who would like to give information or make disclosures about church-related abuse is asked to contact Diocesan Safeguarding Advisor, Jackie Broadfoot (jackie.broadfoot@cofeguildford.org.uk) on 07918 559387.

A dedicated telephone helpline – 0800 80 20 20 – operated independently from the Church of England by the NSPCC has been set up. We hope this will make it easier for you to talk about what happened to you.

Anyone can use the helpline to provide information or to raise concerns regarding abuse within the Church of England context, whether they are reporting issues relating to children or adults or seeking to whistle blow about poor safeguarding practice.

The Bishop of Guildford, The Rt Revd Andrew Watson says: “It is important we do everything we can to make our churches the safest places they can be. Safe means different things to different people but this review will help us to ensure that the concerns reported to our churches have been dealt with properly, and the care taken and the support given is of the high quality that people rightly deserve.  We have learnt from a previous review that survivors and victims’ voices are critical, and I would urge you to come forward.”

We know that local support is also critical. The Diocese of Guildford has established two listening services for those people who have experienced church related abuse but who might want to talk through their experiences and feeling before taking any next step. The two different listening options (one within the Diocese and one managed independently of the Diocese by an organisation called  Thirtyone:eight  will allow those people who do come forward to our Diocesan Safeguarding Advisor, to choose who and how they are supported. More details on these two critical listening services can be found  HERE

Stop Domestic Abuse: COVID-19 Service Delivery Extension of Advice Line Hours

As an important element of their COVID-19 pandemic response, Stop Domestic Abuse will continue to extend the opening hours of the Hampshire Domestic Abuse Service Advice Line until 31 March 2020. Details of the services available are as follows:

 

Stop Domestic Abuse

COVID-19 Service Delivery until 31 March 2021

 

Hampshire Domestic Abuse Service

Email: advice@stopdomesticabuse.uk

Secure email: advice.hampshire@stopdomesticabuse.cjsm.net

Telephone: 033 0016 5112

 

Advice Line opening hours:

For victims, perpetrators and their family/friends and professionals

9.30am-8.00pm Monday –Friday.

 

Refuges can be accessed 24 hrs by calling 033 0016 5112 and following the answerphone instructions.

 

Portsmouth Integrated Domestic Abuse Refuge and Outreach Service

Email: portsmouthreferral@stopdomesticabuse.uk

Secure email: portsmouthreferral@sdas.cjsm.net

Telephone: 02392 065494

Opening hours: 9:00am – 9.00pm Monday-Friday

Weekends and bank holidays 10:00am-6.00pm

Is you behaviour affecting your children – the effect of domestic abuse on children and young people

Is your behaviour affecting your children?

Even if your children haven’t seen you be abusive, they’ve almost certainly overheard things. Children are highly intuitive and can pick up on tension around them. It’s terrifying to hear a parent being abused. To know that someone they love is being harmed, and not knowing how it will end. To be powerless to stop it. Studies have shown that children suffer long-term harm if they live with violence and abuse, even if the abuse isn’t directed at them.

Physical effects

Your children might be physically hurt in the ‘cross-fire’, suffer sleep deprivation and be unable to concentrate at school. They may wet the bed, develop eating disorders, or endure panic attacks, stress and tension.

Emotional effects

Your child will probably feel fear, anger and anxiety, be jumpy or unable to relax. They might struggle to trust you, or others, and develop low self-esteem and psychological problems.

Behavioural effects

Children learn from those around them. Your child could start to model themselves on your violent and abusive behaviour, and bully other children or expect and accept abuse. They might struggle with school work or skip school, steal or break the law, or turn to alcohol and drugs.

It’s easy to minimise your actions. Maybe you think what you’ve done ‘isn’t that bad’. Maybe you’re making excuses.

Or maybe you’re finding the strength, now, to face up to what you’ve done and the effect it’s having on people you care about. Maybe you’re feeling guilty or ashamed of how you’ve behaved.

It can hurt to admit that what you’ve done is not okay. But by doing so and choosing to change, you’re taking responsibility for your actions, and are on the road to change.

Help is available from:

Using drugs or alcohol is never an excuse for violence or abuse

“Alcohol, drugs and stress make me violent”.  Ever heard yourself say that?

Substance use, stress, anger and trauma do not explain or excuse violence – they do not cause you to be abusive or to hurt someone you love.  Most people who drink never use violence or abuse. There is #noexcuseforabuse.

Domestic abuse includes a range of abuse (not just physical) which is an attempt to control and manipulate a partner or ex-partner.  It is unacceptable but help and support is available.  Our services are open and they want to hear from you.

Help is available from:

Advice Line (provided by Stop Domestic Abuse) 03300 165 112 weekdays 9.30am-8pm

COVID helpline for perpetrator support and interventions (provided by the Hampton Trust) 02380 009898, advice@hamptontrust.org.uk

  • One You offers free information and advice on easy ways to gradually drink less
  • Drink Coach offer a free, quick and confidential test to find out how risky your drinking is.
  • A local confidential alcohol helpline is available in Hampshire for people who want further support: 0300 303 3539
  • If you need help with an alcohol or drug problem you can contact Hampshire treatment services for adults or young people. Support is also available to those affected by someone else’s use of drugs or alcohol.  https://www.inclusionhants.org/.

Domestic Abuse help is out there for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender + (LGBT+) communities

Domestic abuse by family, partners, and ex-partners happens in all communities, including to people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender +.  Your abuser may also use your sexuality and gender identity against you as a tactic to keep the power and control in your relationship.  This is not ok.

You are entitled to help as much as any other person.  Help is available, services are open and inclusive, and they want to hear from you.  You will be believed.

Help is available from:

 

 

Advice Line (provided by Stop Domestic Abuse) 03300 165 112 weekdays 9.30am-8pm

 

Galop.org.uk   is the LGBT+ specialist anti-violence charity that works on issues of hate crime, sexual violence, and domestic abuse. Galop runs the National LGBT+ Domestic Abuse Helpline:

Telephone: 0800 999 5428

Email: help@galop.org.uk

  • Hampshire Police Lesbian and Gay Liaison Officers (LAGLOs)

Officers dedicated to supporting members of the LGBT+ community. Trained to respond to LGBT+ domestic abuse and undertake specific risk assessment.

 

  • YOU Trust refuge, Dorset

 

Offers a service to support people from LGBT+ and BAME communities, male victims and women will older boys who would not be able to access most refuge spaces.

Telephone: 0800 032 5204

Email: youfirst@theyoutrust.org.uk

 

For more information:

Help is available for economic abuse

Domestic abuse takes many forms. Economic abuse often happens alongside other types of abuse and is commonly part of a pattern of behaviour where abusers seek to control their victims by means of their finances. They may repeatedly control your everyday actions and take away your choices, becoming violent and abusive (or threatening) if you refuse to meet their demands. With economic abuse, an abuser may restrict how you acquire, spend and manage money and economic resources, such as accommodation, food, clothing and transport (Surviving Economic Abuse, 2020).  They might take your wages, stop you working, or put you in debt.

Social distancing and isolation measures which are in place to control the spread of coronavirus may reinforce the power that an abuser has over you.  If you are concerned about how coronavirus may affect your finances or are experiencing economic abuse, help is available from:

Advice Line (provided by Stop Domestic Abuse) 03300 165 112 weekdays 9.30am-8pm