Community Partnership Information Sharing Forms

Sharing of information is critical to developing a clearer picture of local and wider issues, to inform the actions police need to take to reduce threat, harm and risk.

Hampshire Constabulary are seeking the support of partners, education staff and practitioners to share information known to them which, often without realisation, could provide crucial links where gaps in intelligence might exist.

To help improve information sharing, the CPI form gives professionals a safe and direct way to share non-urgent information with police relating to children/adults at risk of:

  • Missing, Exploited, Trafficked
  • Child Sexual Exploitation
  • Criminal Exploitation
  • Drug Related Harm
  • Modern Day Slavery
  • Community Cohesion
  • Anti-Social Behaviour
  • Organised Crime

 

The CPI Form: Use and Process Summary

If the information known to you is non-urgent, not a crime and a child/adult is not at immediate risk, this is appropriate to be shared as police intelligence using the CPI form. The CPI form is not a referral form, it is for sharing non-urgent information only specific to the risks listed above.

Upon receipt of a CPI form, intelligence handlers assess it to determine the level of risk and priority, this process can amount to one of the following outcomes:

  • CPI sanitised an intelligence log created – added to police systems for officer awareness/action
  • If information details a crime, this is tasked to the crime desk for allocation to be investigated
  • If there is a concern for safety, it will be referred to the relevant safeguarding services/teams
  • In some cases, no action will be taken

For more information, and access to the CPI forms, please click here

NEW SCAM ALERT: Scammers Posing As HCC Officers

Hampshire County Council’s Trading Standards Service have been made aware of false claims, on the phone and at the door, by people purporting to be officers from Hampshire County Council, regarding Care Packages/Carers.

In this case the resident, who is already in receipt of a private care package, received a call from a person who claimed to be from Hampshire County Council. The caller said they would be visiting the resident to discuss their care package. This was followed up by a visit to the resident’s home at 7pm by 1 male and 1 female.

The resident had previously checked with their care provider, who confirmed there was no problem with their care package, that this was not Hampshire County Council, and not to open the door to anyone.   This was confirmed by Adults’ Health and Care. The resident did not let them in, even when the male made the treat that they would have no care provision from the following week if they did not do so.

Residents are asked to be vigilant to this type of scam, and to question any such calls by checking with their care provider using a telephone number they have sourced themselves, not one given by the caller.

Best practice at the door:

  • Don’t answer the door to strangers
  • Look out of a window to see if the caller is known
  • Put the door chain on first to restrict the opening.
  • Do not rely on identity cards as proof that a person is genuine, they are easy to make up.
  • Do not rely on telephone numbers provided by the caller, they may be part of the scam.

To report scams, obtain advice or request a ‘We do not buy goods or servies at the door’ sticker, contact our partners at the Citizens Advice Consumer Service on 0808 223 1133.

Doorstep Crime can also be reported to Hampshire Police on their non-urgent number 101 or dial 999 if you feel threatened or intimidated.

Reducing Parental Conflict: Free Professional Development / Training Opportunity

Free multi agency Reducing Parental Conflict training is now available in Hampshire.  Please see the E-Flier below for further details, including how to book onto the training.

 

Are you working with families where parental conflict is a concern?

The Reducing Parental Conflict Training Programme (RPCP) is part of the Government’s commitment to reducing conflict between parents – whether they are together or separated.

 

What is parental conflict?

Evidence shows that parental conflict puts children’s mental health and long-term future life chances at risk, regardless of whether the parents are together or separated, or are biologically related to the child, such as in blended or foster families.

 

Who should attend?

Any professional working with children, young people and families is well placed to be able to spot, intervene and support families where there is conflict in the relationship of parents, whether they are birth parents or step-parents or carers.

 

Why attend?

Quite simply, for the benefit of vulnerable children and young people whose lives you are helping to improve. Parental conflict is known to be a risk factor for poor child outcomes, particularly when conflict is frequent, intense and poorly resolved.

 

Please promote this training amongst your staff/agency. The training is available via both half day face to face sessions across Hampshire and E Learning. Please direct any queries to cs.nominations@hants.gov.uk or call 01962 715669.

 

New Digital Portal to Strengthen Safeguarding Guidance for Charities

The Government has recently launched a new online portal to strengthen support to charities handling safeguarding concerns or allegations. Every organisation that delivers charitable activities has a responsibility to safeguard people from harm or abuse, whether they are staff members, volunteers, or other people who come into contact with the charity through its work.

The portal can be found here:

Online Portal

It offers a step by step guide to help charities in England correctly manage their concerns and handle the reporting of safeguarding allegations about the behaviour or actions of a person in their charity. It also helps identify the right people to contact if needed and access helpful resources and advice. The portal will be promoted by six organisations across England to champion the importance of good safeguarding and locally available sources of advice and support.

 

2018-19 Safeguarding Adults Collection (SAC) publication released

This publication provides the findings from the Safeguarding Adults Collection (SAC) for the period 1 April 2018 to 31 March 2019. Safeguarding Adults is a statutory duty for Councils with Adult Social Services Responsibilities in England under the Care Act 2014, in order to safeguard adults from abuse or neglect. The data is collected directly from these councils, also known as ‘local authorities’ in this publication.

The aim of this publication is to inform users about aspects of safeguarding activity at national, regional and local level. It is labelled as Experimental Statistics as, due to local variation in how safeguarding activity is defined and reported, there are limitations in the interpretation and usage of the data.

The Adult Social Care Analytical Hub, which is an interactive business intelligence tool published alongside the data tables, presents further insight of the data, including breakdowns by local authority.

New referral mechanism for Modern Slavery

The National Referral Mechanism (NRM) is a framework for identifying and referring potential victims of modern slavery and ensuring they receive the appropriate support.

Modern slavery is a complex crime and may involve multiple forms of exploitation. It encompasses:

  • human trafficking
  • slavery, servitude, and forced or compulsory labour

An individual could have been a victim of human trafficking and/or slavery, servitude and forced or compulsory labour.

Victims may not be aware that they are being trafficked or exploited, and may have consented to elements of their exploitation, or accepted their situation. If you think that modern slavery has taken place, the case should be referred to the NRM so that the Single Competent Authority (SCA) can fully consider the case. You do not need to be certain that someone is a victim.

This guidance explains how to complete the referral form before it is considered by the relevant SCA within the Home Office.

Hampshire and Isle of Wight among Early Adopters of Independent Child Trafficking Guardianship Service

All local authorities within Wales, Greater Manchester, West Midlands Combined Authorities, East Midlands, Croydon, Hampshire and Isle of Wight have become Early Adopter Sites of Independent Child Trafficking Guardianship Service.

Independent Child Trafficking Guardians (ICTGs) are professionals who support children who have potentially been trafficked, and the role of an ICTG is outlined in Section 48 of the Modern Slavery Act 2015, and within the following interim guidance.

ICTGs will provide one-on-one support to trafficked and potentially trafficked children within the Early Adopter Sites where there is no-one with parental responsibility for that child.

Hate Crime Report 2018-2019

This is the eleventh Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) hate crime report, and brings together information on CPS performance in prosecuting racist and religious hate crime, homophobic and transphobic crime, crimes against the older person and disability hate crime. Underlying data contained in this report can be found in the data section of the CPS website (www.cps.gov.uk)

Hate Crime Report 2018-2019

Combating Loneliness; A Guide for Local Authorities

The Local Government Association (LGA), in partnership with the Campaign to End Loneliness and Age UK, have produced Combating Loneliness; A Guide for Local Authorities.

Over 9 million people in the UK across all adult ages – more than the population of London – are either always or often lonely. Half a million older people go at least five or six days a week without seeing or speaking to anyone at all.

If you know someone is lonely or socially isolated, they may be vulnerable, or open to forms of abuse, such as mate crime. There is help and resources available to them. The HSAB campaign for 2019 addresses loneliness and social isolation. For more information visit Connect to Support Hampshire or to report a concern, please contact Hampshire Adults Health & Care on 0300 555 1386.

Click on the links below to view and/or download the posters for the 2019 Loneliness and Social Isolation Campaign:

Loneliness infographic pictureLoneliness Poster 1 PictureLoneliness Poster 2 Picture

Unidentified Adults

The term ‘Unidentified Adults’ refers to an adult who agencies are not aware of, or not engaging with. They could be living within a household where children live or with someone who has regular contact with children. This can be in any capacity (such as parent, partner, grandparents, non-family member etc.)

 

The risk of not engaging effectively with adults who have regular contact with children or live within the family home includes understanding:

  • What the child’s main caregiver and other family members might be saying about the ‘Unidentified Adults’ role within the family
  • The positive contribution which they might make to the needs and welfare of the child
  • What support they may offer to the family, including caring for children
  • Any risks which they might present.

 

The following resources have been produced to assist workers in this area:

icn_web Spotlight on Unidentified Adults

icn_web Unidentified Adults Toolkit